Stress, Anxiety, Depression – Atopic Eczema (AE)/Atopic Dermatitis (AD) and associated Itch

Atopic dermatitis may be caused by genetic predisposition and environmental conditions, including hereditary factors, allergens, and neurogenous (arising from the nervous system, or from some lesion of the nervous system) and immunological factors. However, the major contributing cause remains unknown. AD may cause psychosocial problems such as anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, emotional excitability, stigmatization, social isolation, and discrimination and on the other hand, all of these factors may also contribute to and exacerbate the symptoms of AD. Of the many factors related to atopic dermatitis, psychological stress is considered to be among the most important.1

 The psychological, physical and social impact of AD is complex and varies among different ages. The relationship of stress, anxiety, depression, not to mention feelings of stigma, shame, embarrassment, and low self-esteem all impact upon a person who is suffering from a skin condition such as AD. Research has confirmed that adults with AD exhibit high levels of anxiety, depression, and emotional excitability. Children with AD also have higher levels of emotional distress and more behavioral problems than healthy children or children with minor skin problems. Psychosocial factors contributed in the form of exacerbating factors in as high as 94% of AD hospitalized patients. Clinically, it has long been appreciated that both acute stress (stressful life events) and chronic psycho-emotional stress can trigger or enhance pruritus.2, 3, 4,5

 Pruritus, or itching, is a main symptom of AD and is often one of the first presenting symptoms.

Itching leads to scratching, which leads to and exacerbates the skin lesions.

  • AD has been referred to as the “itch that rashes.”
  • The cycle of itching and scratching is considered an important factor in the maintenance of AD symptoms and is believed to be one of the first symptoms of an impending AD flare.
  • Scratching tends to cause further itching, leading to the so-called “itch-scratch cycle.” 6

Results of one study found that in patients with AD the itching intensity played an important role in determining the patient psychosocial well-being and that a relationship between pruritus and depression was also found.6

 Scratching often begins automatically in association with stress and emotions, and becomes habitual, being performed many times every day. In addition to the psychological factors, such as anger, irritation, impatience, relief, anxiety, etc., many patients say that they somehow find themselves scratching even when they do not feel itchy. Research has identified that habitual scratching is involved in the formation of the lesions of AD. The scratching is patterned, with the rash exhibiting a bilaterally symmetrical distribution over the back and normal skin remaining in the middle where the hands cannot reach, producing a “butterfly” sign. The prominent red face can also be explained by this scratching behavior.4

 This vicious cycle can cause sleeplessness in over 65% of AD sufferers leading to sleep deprivation which leads to tiredness, mood changes and impaired psychosocial functioning of the sufferer and their family, particularly at school and work. Embarrassment, comments, teasing and bullying frequently cause social isolation and may lead to depression or school/work avoidance. The sufferer’s lifestyle is often limited, particularly in respect to clothing, holidays, staying with friends, owning pets, swimming or the ability to play or do sports. For parents caring for a child with eczema, restriction of normal family life, difficulties with complicated treatment regimens causing an increased work load together with disturbed sleep can lead to parental exhaustion and feelings of hopelessness, guilt, anger and depression. And so the whole family is impacted by the condition.5,6,7

Research has suggested that some AD patients might benefit from certain psychological interventions: patients showing psychological characteristics that comprises high depression, low agreeableness and high public self-consciousness would probably benefit from psychological interventions, such as cognitive restructuring, anger management and self-assertiveness training, because these interventions might be able to modulate the extent of the personality characteristics that are associated with induced itch.8

Recent emerging research indicates that mindfulness meditation training may have beneficial effects across a spectrum of health conditions, but the mechanisms linking mindfulness meditation training with health are unknown. One striking feature of the mindfulness training literature to-date is that mindfulness training effects on disease outcomes have been observed in diseases where stress is known to trigger the onset or exacerbation of disease symptoms and pathogenesis (e.g., HIV, psoriasis, depression, pain, chronic inflammation).9   Research has indicated that relaxation techniques appear to be helpful in the treatment of patients suffering from chronic itch in patients that are open to it. And it is becoming a standard recommendation by many Practitioners and hospitals that relaxation training be considered clinically in patients who report that their itch increases during periods of heightened stress.10

The challenge for sufferers of AD is, with the aim of improving their quality of life, to help themselves to find, together with their practitioner, the best personal treatment plan and then sticking to it. The main challenges in the effective management of AD, comes down to patient adherence to the treatment plan and their emotional resilience.

 

References

  1. Kwon1 J.A. et al.; Does Stress Increase the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescents? Results of the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey (KYRBWS-VI); PLOS ONE, www.plosone.org; August 2013, Volume 8, Issue 8, e67890
  2. Han-Ting Wei et al.; Risk of developing major depression and bipolar disorder among adolescents with atopic diseases: A nationwide longitudinal study in Taiwan; Journal of Affective Disorders 203 (2016) 221–226
  3. Buske KIrschbaum Hellhammer et al.,; Endocrine and immune responses to stress in chronic inflammatory skin disorders; 992. 231-240 (2003)
  4. Sang Ho Oh et al.; Association of Stress with Symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis; Acta Derm Venereol 2010; 90: 582–588. The Journal of Clinical Investigation; http://www.jci.org; Volume 116, Number 5, May 2006
  5. Kamide R.; Atopic Dermatitis: Psychological Care; Journal of the Japan Medical Association (Vol. 126, No. 1, 2001, pages 59–62).
  6. Brown T.M. et al.; Assessing Pruritus Among Patients With Atopic Dermatitis: Targeted Literature and Instrument Review; https://www.rtihs.org/sites/default/files/Brown_isporposter_May2012.pdf
  7. Lewis-Jones S. Quality of life and childhood atopic dermatitis: the misery of living with childhood eczema. Int J Clin Pract. 2006;60(8):984-992.
  8. Schut C. et al.; Personality Traits, Depression and Itch in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis in an Experimental Setting: A Regression Analysis; Acta Derm Venereol 2014; 94: 20–25
  9. Creswell J.D. et al.; Brief mindfulness meditation training alters psychological and neuroendocrine responses to social evaluative stress; Psychoneuroendocrinology (2014) 44, 1—12
  10. Schut C. et al.; Psychological Interventions in the Treatment of Chronic Itch; Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Preview

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